pameladlloyd: Happy Bear by Boynton, "Oh, What a Great Moment!" (What a Great Moment!)
My friend, the terrific author Janni Lee Simner [identity profile] janni.livejournal.com, is offering prizes in connection with the paperback release of her YA novel Faerie Winter.

Faerie Winter novel cover

Faerie Winter is the sequel to Jannie's novel Bones of Faerie. These are the first two books in her Bones of Faerie trilogy. Bones of Faerie is a great book with one of the best opening chapters I've ever had the pleasure to read. While I haven't yet read Faerie Winter, I'm sure it meets the same high standards as the first in the series. Janni Lee Simner's Bones of Faerie series has received high praise from many distinguished authors and reviewers.

I highly recommend you read these books.

The Rules (as posted at http://janni.livejournal.com/780608.html)

- Mention in a blog post, fb post, tweet, tumblr, and/or anywhere else online and publicly visible that Faerie Winter comes out in paperback on April 10 and that it's the sequel to Bones of Faerie (or, alternately, book 2 in the Bones of Faerie trilogy). If you want to say something more about either of the Faerie books, that'd be lovely, though not required.

- Link to the Faerie Winter website

- Come back to [Janni's] post and link to the places you did both of the above

- (optional, for blog entries) Copy these rules (including this one :-)) to your post, and encourage your readers to enter this contest by doing all of the above in turn, and telling them to then to come back to your blog and link to their mention or mentions

- Deadline is April 20 (at midnight Pacific Daylight Time) and [Janni will] ship anywhere.
pameladlloyd: Romantic watercolor image of a woman gazing at the moon (Moon Gazing)
I just finished reading the most wonderful fairytale. Although recently written, it has the timeless feel of the fairytales I grew up reading.

Go! Read "The River of the Fire of Life" by Francesca Forrest (aka [livejournal.com profile] asakiyume) on page 36 of the current issue of New Fairy Tales. Then (if you're on Facebook) go like New Fairy Tales on Facebook and tell them how wonderful this story is. Then go tell [livejournal.com profile] asakiyume how wonderful her story is.

That. Is. All.
pameladlloyd: Fairy with dice, children's book illustration by Christian Martin Weiss (Gambling Fairy)
I hope all of my American friends and readers had a wonderful Thanksgiving holiday. Thanksgiving day was great for me and my family, with a wonderful home-cooked vegetarian meal. Our home is turkey-friendly. :-)

Friday morning, however, I woke coughing, as the nasty virus/flu/what-have-you that has plagued me since at least the last week in October returned, this time as a bacterial infection. Monday, tired of coughing so hard it was hard to catch my breath during an attack, I dragged myself in to the medical clinic, where I was diagnosed with bronchitis and put on powerful antibiotics. I'm not completely well, yet, but definitely feeling much better.

Also on Monday, I received a package in the mail. Last week, based on a mention by a LiveJournal friend, [livejournal.com profile] asakiyume, I ordered some Soliga Forest Honey from Himalaya Herbal Healthcare. Also, what with my cough, and all, I ordered some Koflet lozenges.

Here's what arrived:
IMAG0093

You'll notice that they added something--a tube of Himalaya lip care--as a free gift.

The first thing I did was to take a cough drop and make some herbal tea sweetened with honey.

IMAG0094

The cough drops have a bit of bite. I really like them. The honey is very dark and thick. It has a very complex flavor, a bit tart, which makes regular honey seem over-sweet in comparison. The lip care is fabulous, probably the best of any I've tried, with a coconut oil base, plus sesame seed oil, cocoa butter, and other natural ingredients. It was badly needed, as my lips were quite chapped, so it was a very welcome gift.

I just posted a short note on Goodreads.
The Annotated Wizard of Oz (Centennial Edition) (Oz, #1)The Annotated Wizard of Oz (Centennial Edition) by L. Frank Baum




I found this book on the library shelves when I was in El Paso this summer. I was really enjoying it, but my schedule while there made my progress slow and I haven't yet had the time (work) and energy (illness) to see if it's available in the Tucson library. I definitely hope to finish this book, as I found it to be a fascinating glimpse into Baum's life and writings that went far beyond other biographical essays I've read about him. I also appreciated the insight into the different artists and into publishing during that era.



View all my reviews


Also, in other news, I'm very happy to say that I'll be returning to the Pima Community College West Campus Learning Center as a part-time staff member and tutor. I'll be starting Monday afternoon
pameladlloyd: Fairy with dice, children's book illustration by Christian Martin Weiss (Gambling Fairy)
My very good friend, [livejournal.com profile] frankieroberts, has just made her first book sale! To sweeten this, she found out on her birthday! Check out her blog post at TusCon 37 and A Sale! for the details.

Frankie and I used to be in the same writers' group. While I'm no longer part of the group since I just haven't been able to keep to a regular writing schedule, I've had the pleasure hearing Frankie read at our local con, TusCon. I was very disappointed to have missed her reading at the con this year, as illness kept me from attending. I've even had her reading on my Google Calendar for weeks, just to make sure I was there, because she's writing the kind of paranormal romance I enjoy and she's gotten very, very good.

So, drop by her blog for the low-down on the book, and keep your eyes peeled for Veiled Mirror. You won't be sorry.
pameladlloyd: Alya, an original character by Ian L. Powell (library stairs)
This weekend I spent at the Tucson Festival of Books (TFoB), on the University of Arizona Mall. I can't stress enough what a wonderful, well-organized, and amazing celebration of reading and writing this is. Even more amazing is that it is entirely free, yes FREE!, to the public. Check out the list of authors who attended. If you're local, I hope you were there (and if you weren't, why not?); if you're not local, consider visiting Tucson for next year's festival, to be held March 12-13, 2011.

The TFoB is both like and unlike a science fiction convention. There were many, many fans and authors, panels, discussions, and workshops. In that respect, it was very like a con. But, there were no (or I missed them) fans in costumes, although there were a few costumed characters, such as the Easter bunny and Little Critter (whom both I and another writer misidentified as Little Monster), who were willing to pose with kids while their parents took pictures. *sigh* It's just been too many years since I read Mercer Mayer's books with any regularity. There was also spectacle, in the form of a "literary circus." There were multiple activities for kids, musical performances, food booths run by local restaurants, and booths for just about any organization or group with a literary connection that you can imagine, plus several with no obvious literary connection; as I commented to a friend Sunday afternoon, readers and authors all generally live in houses and drive cars.

far too much detail-lol )
pameladlloyd: Alya, an original character by Ian L. Powell (reading fairy)
One of the things I sometimes discuss with the students I tutor is the fact that reading and writing are fairly new for humans. We didn't evolve (in the prehistorical sense) to do these things, because they weren't part of the environment we evolved to survive—but they are very much part of the environment we live in today, very much a survival requirement. [livejournal.com profile] mount_oregano touches on this briefly, when she notes, "Speaking is instinctive, but writing is a technology: a code," in the opening line of her informative and enjoyable post about the ways in which writing has developed to support the ways in which people read.
pameladlloyd: Alya, an original character by Ian L. Powell (library stairs)
I've been reading The Power of Myth by Joseph Campbell with Bill Moyers, recently. While I've read portions of several of Joseph Campbell's works, it was generally in the context of research I was doing while I was a student. My eldest son has the DVD set of Bill Moyer's interviews with Campbell, which I've been thinking of watching, and I decided that I would get the most out of them by reading the book beforehand.

I'm struck by how often something Campbell says has me wanting to jump up and find someone to share the passage with. I also find myself deeply appreciative of Campbell's statements about myth as metaphor, which help me to contextualize religion in a way that works for me.

The passage I wanted to share with you tonight is on page 71, in the chapter titled, "The Journey Inward." The point of discussion in which this takes place has wandered from a discussion of myth and religion to the relationship between myth and folktales.

Anyone writing a creative work knows that you open, you yield yourself, and the book talks to you and builds itself. To a certain extent, you become the carrier of something that is given to you from what have been called the Muses&emdash;or, in biblical language, "God." This is no fancy, it is a fact. Since the inspiration comes from the unconscious, and since the unconscious minds of the people of any single small society have much in common, what the shaman or seer brings forth is something that is waiting to be brought forth in everyone. So when one hears the seer's story, one responds, "Aha! This is my story. This is something that I had always wanted to say but wasn't able to say." There has to be a dialogue, and interaction between the seer and the community. The seer who sees things that people in the community don't want to hear is just ineffective. Sometimes they will wipe him out.

In addition to his opening statement about the place from which creativity springs in any writer (and I think it's fair to think this would apply to any artist), Campbell seems to be suggesting that there is very close connection between the writer/artist and the mystic.

When I think about my own writing process—which is a fitful one, full of days in which no worthwhile writing (or, indeed, any writing, at all) is forthcoming, or days in which every word seems to be dragged painfully from some deep well, yet also sprinkled here and there with times and days when the words just flow onto the page with very little effort or apparent conscious thinking on my part—I wonder how that fits into Campbell's view of creativity. I don't think of myself as a mystic, and I would have to say that I am probably not particularly attuned to the unconscious minds of the vast majority of the people in our society (which is, of course, a large, rather than small, one), but perhaps this is why I struggle so hard.

The preceding paragraph is one in which I'm pretty much thinking out loud. If I'd been willing to get out of bed last night, immediately after reading this passage, to share it with you, I probably would have had something very different to say. Certainly, at that moment, I had a complex, excited reaction to what I'd read. Part of this was the immediate question as I read the first sentence about whether the creative process really is that similar for all writers and artists, or whether some (possibly those who prefer detailed outlines?) would reject this notion.

So, I turn this over to you, my friends.

Do you experience the writing process as something you must open yourself to, as something to which you must yield? (As I wrote that, I realized that there is a part of me that hates yielding to that impulse, even as I long to; I want to strike this confession from any public setting, but I am going to resist doing so, because I think it may be a key component of the struggle I have as a writer and I'm sure I'm not unique.)

Do you feel that, as a writer or artist of any kind, you resemble a mystic or seer? Or, do you reject that comparison?
pameladlloyd: Alya, an original character by Ian L. Powell (Default)
Thanks to [livejournal.com profile] marycatelli for the link to the web comic Gunnerkrigg Court. Lots of fun!
pameladlloyd: Fairy with dice, children's book illustration by Christian Martin Weiss (Gambling Fairy)
Manually echoed from http://pdlloyd.livejournal.com/84785.html.

I've been reading a number of short stories recently, mostly online. Only recently has it occurred to me that I should keep a list,* or at least share the links. Here's what's open in my browser, right now (Yay! for tabbed browsing).

Silent As Dust by James Maxey (I just finished this. It was fun.)

Escape to Other Worlds with Science Fiction by Jo Walton, aka [community profile] papersky (I haven't started this, yet, so I can't say anything about it from a personal perspective, but it's slated for inclusion in Gardner Dozois Year's Best Science Fiction.)

Tam Lin Balladry: Comparing Tam Lin to Other Stories (Okay, so it's not a short story, nor is it even a single story, but I decided to stick it in, anyway. I love fairy tales and I'm constantly collecting links to fairy tale pages.)

The Only One He Ever Feared by Patty Jansen, aka [profile] mikandra (This is another I haven't started reading. I don't think I've ever read any of her stories and I always look forward to reading something by an author new to me, or, in this case, whose stories are new to me.)

Matchless: A Christmas Story by Gregory Maguire (I was about halfway through when I was interupted; I may have to start over, in order to get the full effect,** but I was enjoying what I was reading. At the same time, I have to admit that I'm not sure why I started reading this (other than the novelty of finding a fantasy story on NPR's website). Andersen's "The Little Match Girl" is one of my least favorite stories, and Maguire's works tend to leave me filled with doubts, maybe because his view of the tales that inspire him are so good at turning things on their head. But, then again, I suppose that's why I read him. Hmm.)

Some of these have been open for several days, without my getting back to them. I often open pages to be read later, for various reasons. Fortunately, my browser will remember what I had open, even if it's closed.

I also checked out Fantasy: The Best of the Year, 2007 Edition from the library this afternoon, simply because I happened to notice it on the shelf. I'm a fan of the Datlow et al Year's Best collections; I first started reading these when Ellen Datlow ([personal profile] ellen_datlow) and Terry Windling ([profile] t_windling) were co-editors, which was a fabulous combination. This is by another editor, Rich Horton ([profile] ecbatan). I don't know his work as well, so this will be an adventure.***

The other short story activity I've been engaged in recently started at Pima Community College, in the Learning Center where I volunteer. The last week was very quiet, so while I was sitting in the writing area to be available to students, I pulled a copy of Literature and Its Writers: An Introduction to Fiction, Poetry, and Drama by Ann Charters and Samuel Charters from the shelf and started reading and taking notes. I'll have more on that to say later, after I figure out what I did with all my notes.




* Well, that's not exactly true. I suggested a long time ago to Goodreads that they add short stories to the listings.

** I'll be discussing this at greater length when I discuss my notes from Literature and Its Writers, but accoring to Poe, short stories should be read in a single, uninterrupted reading in order for the reader to get "the immense force derivable from totality."

*** It's amazing how many writers and editors are on LiveJournal. I love the sense of community this creates. I hope I've found everybody, especially the ones on my friends list.

ETA: Added links to Wikipedia pages for Ann and Samuel Charters.
pameladlloyd: Alya, an original character by Ian L. Powell (reading)
I've been reading a number of short stories recently, mostly online. Only recently has it occurred to me that I should keep a list,* or at least share the links. Here's what's open in my browser, right now (Yay! for tabbed browsing).

Silent As Dust by James Maxey (I just finished this. It was fun.)

Escape to Other Worlds with Science Fiction by Jo Walton, aka [livejournal.com profile] papersky (I haven't started this, yet, so I can't say anything about it from a personal perspective, but it's slated for inclusion in Gardner Dozois Year's Best Science Fiction.)

Tam Lin Balladry: Comparing Tam Lin to Other Stories (Okay, so it's not a short story, nor is it even a single story, but I decided to stick it in, anyway. I love fairy tales and I'm constantly collecting links to fairy tale pages.)

The Only One He Ever Feared by Patty Jansen, aka [livejournal.com profile] mikandra (This is another I haven't started reading. I don't think I've ever read any of her stories and I always look forward to reading something by an author new to me, or, in this case, whose stories are new to me.)

Matchless: A Christmas Story by Gregory Maguire (I was about halfway through when I was interupted; I may have to start over, in order to get the full effect,** but I was enjoying what I was reading. At the same time, I have to admit that I'm not sure why I started reading this (other than the novelty of finding a fantasy story on NPR's website). Andersen's "The Little Match Girl" is one of my least favorite stories, and Maguire's works tend to leave me filled with doubts, maybe because his view of the tales that inspire him are so good at turning things on their head. But, then again, I suppose that's why I read him. Hmm.)

Some of these have been open for several days, without my getting back to them. I often open pages to be read later, for various reasons. Fortunately, my browser will remember what I had open, even if it's closed.

I also checked out Fantasy: The Best of the Year, 2007 Edition from the library this afternoon, simply because I happened to notice it on the shelf. I'm a fan of the Datlow et al Year's Best collections; I first started reading these when Ellen Datlow ([livejournal.com profile] ellen_datlow) and Terry Windling ([livejournal.com profile] t_windling) were co-editors, which was a fabulous combination. This is by another editor, Rich Horton ([livejournal.com profile] ecbatan). I don't know his work as well, so this will be an adventure.***

The other short story activity I've been engaged in recently started at Pima Community College, in the Learning Center where I volunteer. The last week was very quiet, so while I was sitting in the writing area to be available to students, I pulled a copy of Literature and Its Writers: An Introduction to Fiction, Poetry, and Drama by Ann Charters and Samuel Charters from the shelf and started reading and taking notes. I'll have more on that to say later, after I figure out what I did with all my notes.




* Well, that's not exactly true. I suggested a long time ago to Goodreads that they add short stories to the listings.

** I'll be discussing this at greater length when I discuss my notes from Literature and Its Writers, but accoring to Poe, short stories should be read in a single, uninterrupted reading in order for the reader to get "the immense force derivable from totality."

*** It's amazing how many writers and editors are on LiveJournal. I love the sense of community this creates. I hope I've found everybody, especially the ones on my friends list.

ETA: Added links to Wikipedia pages for Ann and Samuel Charters.
pameladlloyd: Alya, an original character by Ian L. Powell (reading fairy)
Realms of Fantasy Magazine now has a spiffy, upgraded website, where you can download a free PDF copy of their current issue. Yes, that's right, the current issue. For free!

The decision to release the magazine as a free PDF was made in order to introduce the upcoming availability of the magazine in various electronic formats, such as Kindle and Sony, as well as to give folks a chance to check out their content. This doesn't mean that they'll be discontinuing the beautiful print format, which should be available in a book store near you. Instead it shows that the folks who wouldn't let this wonderful magazine die are keenly aware of today's market and making sure that they take advantage of all possible formats in which readers may want to interact with the magazine.
pameladlloyd: Alya, an original character by Ian L. Powell (read or die)
I've just discovered a cool website on education, The Daily Riff, and I couldn't be more thrilled. I love the way it's organized into topics like, "People, Politics, & Business," "Global," "Learning, Innovation, & Tech," etc.

I've barely had a chance to explore it, but here's one article that caught my eye: Three Great Books to Read Aloud to Your Tweens & Teens (Yes, you heard right). The author tells us that she reads aloud for about fifteen minutes a day to her daughter (who presumably falls within the specified age range). It's one of her daughter's favorite activities.

This afternoon, while driving around town, when I saw a billboard admonishing parents to read aloud for fifteen minutes to their children (illustrated by a photo of a man reading to a cute little girl of about five or six), my reaction was to think to myself that fifteen minutes was way too short. (But, then, I'm a mom who started reading to her children before they could walk or talk. By the time my first son was a year old, I could read to him for an hour and he'd cry when I stopped.) Then I reflected that if the goal was to get parents who weren't already reading to their kids to start, it was better not to overwhelm them with a more extensive time span.

But, to get back to the article, and the idea of reading to tweens and teens, how many of you do, or did, this? How many of you had parents that did this? If so, did a specific time limit apply? Were you consistent, trying to read every night, or for a certain number of nights a week? Was this a one parent-one child phenomenon, or did the whole family participate? Do you think the way you were read to contributed to your current attitudes about books? Do you think the way you're reading to your child(ren) has contributed to their attitudes about books? Does reading books together help to form a bond between parents and their children?

Here are my answers )
pameladlloyd: Fairy with dice, children's book illustration by Christian Martin Weiss (Gambling Fairy)
Echoed manually, and on time, for once, from http://pdlloyd.livejournal.com/83328.html.

I've just discovered a cool website on education, The Daily Riff, and I couldn't be more thrilled. I love the way it's organized into topics like, "People, Politics, & Business," "Global," "Learning, Innovation, & Tech," etc.

I've barely had a chance to explore it, but here's one article that caught my eye: Three Great Books to Read Aloud to Your Tweens & Teens (Yes, you heard right). The author tells us that she reads aloud for about fifteen minutes a day to her daughter (who presumably falls within the specified age range). It's one of her daughter's favorite activities.

This afternoon, while driving around town, when I saw a billboard admonishing parents to read aloud for fifteen minutes to their children (illustrated by a photo of a man reading to a cute little girl of about five or six), my reaction was to think to myself that fifteen minutes was way too short. (But, then, I'm a mom who started reading to her children before they could walk or talk. By the time my first son was a year old, I could read to him for an hour and he'd cry when I stopped.) Then I reflected that if the goal was to get parents who weren't already reading to their kids to start, it was better not to overwhelm them with a more extensive time span.

But, to get back to the article, and the idea of reading to tweens and teens, how many of you do, or did, this? How many of you had parents that did this? If so, did a specific time limit apply? Were you consistent, trying to read every night, or for a certain number of nights a week? Was this a one parent-one child phenomenon, or did the whole family participate? Do you think the way you were read to contributed to your current attitudes about books? Do you think the way you're reading to your child(ren) has contributed to their attitudes about books? Does reading books together help to form a bond between parents and their children?

Here are my answers )
pameladlloyd: Alya, an original character by Ian L. Powell (Kitty Call Out)
Vera Nazarian ([livejournal.com profile] norilana) of Norilana Books is struggling financially and asking that folks help get the word out about her most recent novel, Mansfield Park and Mummies: Monster Mayhem, Matrimony, Ancient Curses, True Love, and Other Dire Delights (available from Barnes & Noble, Amazon, and a host of other sources).

Lest you wish to quibble at the thought of the damage a current-day author may have done to Austen's work, here's what Norilana Books has to say about the authors:
Jane Austen is an author of classic immortal prose.

Vera Nazarian is a shameless Harridan who has taken it upon herself to mangle Jane Austen's classic immortal prose.
[livejournal.com profile] norilana has excerpts in her journal, starting with Chapter 1. You can also read excerpts of the excerpts on Jane Austin Today.
pameladlloyd: Alya, an original character by Ian L. Powell (reading fairy)
The Name of the Wind (The Kingkiller Chronicle: Day One) The Name of the Wind by Patrick Rothfuss


My review


rating: 5 of 5 stars
Wow! Just . . . Wow.



I loved this book. Reading it was like reading a distillation of all I like in fantasy fiction.


View all my reviews.
pameladlloyd: Alya, an original character by Ian L. Powell (Alice and Rabbit)
One of the blogs I follow is the Writer Beware Blogs!. A recent post by Victoria Strauss, It's Official: DOJ Investigates Google Book Settlement discusses the complex Google Books Settlement, which requires a number of authors and publishers to make a crucial decision to opt in or out of the settlement, before fairness hearings and the results of a DOJ investigation are complete.

As I don't have any published novels and I'm not a member of the Authors' Guild, I don't (to the best of my knowledge) have an official stake in the issue, but it's possible that some of you, Fair Readers and Steadfast Friends, may. So, you may want to go check out Victoria Strauss' take on this and consider your options.

ETA Here's a very different take on the Google Books Settlement, courtesy of Lisa Gold: Research Maven: "…those lost books of the last century can be brought back to life and made searchable, discoverable, and citable…".
pameladlloyd: Alya, an original character by Ian L. Powell (Flycon Alien Flutterby)
Just in case it's slipped your mind, this is a reminder that Flycon 2009 has started, over at [livejournal.com profile] flycon2009 and at SFF Net.

If you have the time, drop on by. :)
pameladlloyd: Alya, an original character by Ian L. Powell (reading)
Award-winning author Eugie Foster ([livejournal.com profile] eugie) is hosting a book launch party in her journal for her short story collection, Returning My Sister's Face and Other Far Eastern Tales of Whimsy and Malice, published by Norilana Books. For more information about the author and the book, see the Norilana press release issued by [livejournal.com profile] norilanabooks.

I love the title of this book and the cover is absolutely gorgeous. She's another author whose work I know only by reputation, but whose book absolutely must go on my to-read list. As an added bonus, Ms. Foster is offering anyone who purchases the book this month a limited edition of the Returning My Sister's Face audio MP3 CD, which has audio versions of five of the stories, including one previously unreleased.
pameladlloyd: Alya, an original character by Ian L. Powell (reading fairy)
Sean Williams ([livejournal.com profile] ladnews) announced today that his book, The Crooked Letter, the first in his Books of the Cataclysm series, has been released as a free PDF.

If you're unfamiliar with his work, this is a great chance to find out if you want to spring for the whole series.

Publishers Weekly, btw, has one of the oddest reviews I've ever seen. It starts with high praise, "expertly twists the familiar into the grotesque in this deeply spooky story", but later states about a protagonist: "it's never clear why Hadrian doesn't simply kill himself." Uhm, just a guess, but maybe because he wants to live, as well as to solve the central problem in the story? *shakes head at the vagaries of reviewers*

The other reviews listed are fabulous. I'm looking forward to the story, if not to reading it on my computer.
pameladlloyd: Alya, an original character by Ian L. Powell (Palimpsest)
How could I resist an opportunity to help an author get the word out about her newest book, while at the same time putting myself in line to possibly win a copy of said book and all sorts of really cool, wonderful goodies inspired by the book? Including chocolate. And jewelry. Did I mention chocolate?

So, with no further ado, I introduce you to Palimpsest by Catherynne M. Valente ([livejournal.com profile] yuki_onna).

I also recommend that you check out her post announcing the book, the contest, and the many tie-in products, several of which are the work of folk who are also part of the LiveJournal community.

How did I discover this book? Well, via [livejournal.com profile] faerie_writer most recently. (But also many others, some from outside of LJ. Hrmm. I suppose all these mentions mean I have competition for the prize. *glares*) I also followed a link to [livejournal.com profile] yuki_onna's evocative trailer, possibly from a link on one of the many blogs about writing and books that distract me from getting work done keep me apprised of the industry.

Catherine's book The Orphan's Tales: In the Night Garden has been on my Goodreads to-read list for several months, since shortly after I read one of her short stories, and all of her books get great reviews, so I'm sure this new one will be wonderful. Valente was recently interviewed by Green Man Review about The Orphans Tale and I love the way she describes her choice to use the structure of The Arabian Nights for her tale as a means of telling the story of a young girl. I've moved this to the top of my to-read list and reserved it from our local library. I'd do the same with Palimpsest, but since I'm out of work, I'm not buying new books and I don't know whether or when they'll get it in. I've learned to my chagrin that I can't borrow new books using the Interlibrary Loan System, only books that are at least a year old, so I've really got my fingers crossed that I'll win a copy.

I've missed telling you all sorts of exciting news, so please, whatever else you do, go check out her announcement post and the companion music by [livejournal.com profile] s00j.

ETA: Here, let Catherynne Valente, in this post on John Scalzi's blog, tell you about Palimpsest.

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